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Bulgarian Spa Treatments

As the rain, fog and cold, dull weather continues, the lure of the summer sun makes us flick through our holiday brochures and plan ahead and this year with a recession raging in the West, a holiday to Bulgaria is a cost effective solution to getting away, but saving money in the process. However, if you were hoping for something a little more luxurious than a summer burn on the beach consider taking time out on a spa holiday. You can either book straight into one of the Black Sea’s leading spa hotels or go there on a day to day basis to take advantage of the treatments on offer. We take a look at some of the therapies on offer and explain how they could be of benefit to you.

 

 

Galvanic Baths

Not an attractive name for a spa treatment but do not be put off by this. A galvanic bath is a type of electrotherapy involving electric currents passed through a warm bath. The current passes through your body and is useful for treating degenerative diseases arthritis and joint problems. The treatment substantially alleviates pain and improves the circulation and whilst the notion of electricity and water may scare you, rest assured that this method of treatment, which originated in Canada, has been well researched and tested and will not endanger you life in any way.

Mineral Water Baths

Mineral water has played a part in natural health therapies for centuries and Bulgaria has an abundance of natural mineral springs, which many hotels use in their treatments. Guaranteed to give you a healthy glow, mineral baths do more for your outward appearance than miracle creams or botox. The reason for the success of this treatment lies in the fact that mineral water is made up of more than double the amount of chloride and silica than ordinary water; these two components help rejuvenate your hair, skin and bones as well as preventing skin disorders and swelling. Many Bulgarian hotels have mineral water swimming pools, which you can enjoy with the whole family; others will immerse you in a warm bath or wrap you in mineral water soaked towels. Whatever the method used, the water will relieve pain including frequent cramp and also promotes a feeling of relaxation and restfulness. Cold mineral baths may seem like torture at first, but they are excellent for relieving inflammation and fevers.

Shirodhara

This is a form of Indian Ayurvedic treatment, which involves the gentle pouring of liquid over the forehead to stimulate what ancient Indians called the third eye. A variety of liquids can be used according to the ailment being treated and they include oil, milk, buttermilk and coconut water. This therapy is excellent for treating diseases of the eye, premature greyness, sinusitis, memory loss, allergic rhinitis, neurological disorders, insomnia, hearing disorders, vertigo and psoriasis. It is also a great way to relax.

Mud Baths and Wraps

In areas like Bulgaria where there are abundant mineral springs, the mud from hot water springs combines with volcanic ash in the ground to create a rich, natural healing treatment not found in expensive creams or painkillers. They are particularly good for relieving arthritis as well as for smoothing the skin, relieving inflammation and aches around the joints. Some hotels apply mud to the body in wraps, with the aim of slimming and toning the body, relaxing the muscles and rehydrating the skin. The mud is an excellent way to flush out toxins and leave the skin firm, cleanse open pores and ease water retention. Mud wraps are a little like mummification; mud is skillfully applied all over your body and then you are wrapped in special bandages.

 

Thalassotherapy

This therapy gives no clues in its name but it is the treatment of disease with sea water, which is believed to revive open pores and the skin in general. The high concentrations of magnesium, iodide, calcium, sodium and potassium found in Black Sea water are absorbed into the skin creating a rejuvenating and refreshing effect. Spa centres offering this treatment tend to treat patients with warm sea water showers or baths.

Hydrotherapy

Hydrotherapy is the generic term for a range of water treatments using jets, underwater massage and mineral baths including Jacuzzis and whirl pools. This type of treatment uses the temperature and pressure of spa water to stimulate the body’s circulation and treat certain pain and diseases like arthritis, spondylitis, burns, spinal cord injuries, spasticity, stroke or paralysis.

Mineral Water Baths

Mineral water has played a part in natural health therapies for centuries and Bulgaria has an abundance of natural mineral springs, which many hotels use in their treatments. Guaranteed to give you a healthy glow, mineral baths do more for your outward appearance than miracle creams or botox. The reason for the success of this treatment lies in the fact that mineral water is made up of more than double the amount of chloride and silica than ordinary water; these two components help rejuvenate your hair, skin and bones as well as preventing skin disorders and swelling. Many Bulgarian hotels have mineral water swimming pools, which you can enjoy with the whole family; others will immerse you in a warm bath or wrap you in mineral water soaked towels. Whatever the method used, the water will relieve pain including frequent cramp and also promotes a feeling of relaxation and restfulness. Cold mineral baths may seem like torture at first, but they are excellent for relieving inflammation and fevers.

Massage

All spa centres offer a wide variety of therapeutic massage with each one aimed at fixing some general medical problem as well as relaxing and reviving a tired body. A Kese massage is a traditional Turkish massage where the body is rubbed with a glove called a hamam.  This cleans the body, opening pores and stimulating the skin to show a smooth elasticity and healthier colour. Aromatherapy massages consist of applying essential oils, which are fragrant concentrations of oils from plants, flowers, trees, fruit, bark, grasses and seeds mixed with the flowers leaves. They are thought to contain therapeutic, psychological and physiological properties, which amongst other things help to promote good circulation and increase the skin’s resistance to toxins. A more unusual massage is the raindrops massage, which combines foam from a Turkish bath with jets from a powerful spa shower. Lymphatic drainage consists of a gentle massage designed to stimulate the lymph glands to diffuse the toxins and fluids released as a result of cell circulation. Reflexology is a form of foot massage, which originated in China and India. It is aimed at promoting the circulation of the blood and restoring the natural balance of the body by using pressure points on the foot associated with other parts of the body.